Case Studies

STIR Case Study
Binti & San Francisco

STIR Case Study
LotaData & San Leandro

STIR Case Study
Preschool2me & Oakland

STIR Case Study
Appledore & West Sacramento

Testimonials

The Different Paths Los Angeles And San Francisco Are Taking To Spur Civic Innovation

– Fast Company

Both cities realized they could tap into their startup communities to help make government services run better. And both cities provide lessons in the benefits—and pitfalls—of doing so.

San Francisco proves that city-startup collaboration can work

– ReadWrite

It’s tough for startups – with shorter capital runways and track records – to work with the long sales cycles, aging systems and bureaucratic requirements of cities. And governments often find themselves frustrated, working with legacy systems that need the support of new technology to keep up with the increases in urbanization and use of services. But these startups have amazing solutions for cities, and in San Francisco, the Mayor’s Office of Civic Innovation implemented their new Startup in Residence (STIR) Program.

Mayor Lee Announces STIR Program Results

– San Francisco News

Mayor Edwin M. Lee along with the mayors from Oakland, San Leandro, and West Sacramento announced the results of the 2016 Startup in Residence program, according to a press release from the mayor’s office. The STIR program is a 16-week program with the goal of addressing regional civic challenges, and the announcement highlighted new technology products that were developed from the program.

Leveraging Startup Culture to Improve Local Government

– The Intersector Project

As advancements in technology revolutionize customer experiences in every aspect of our residents’ lives, local governments are under evolutionary pressure to adapt or risk losing the support and trust of the communities they serve. However, by design, governmental entities are organized to be risk-averse and slow to change – exactly the opposite of the nimble qualities that drive the rapid technological advancements shaping the world around us. How can local governments bridge this gap?

2016 Startup in Residence Program Comes to a Close as Participants Showcase Inventions

– Govtech.com

Tech entrepreneurs partnering with San Francisco, Oakland, San Leandro and West Sacramento reveal how they are reinventing city services in California and beyond.

Gov Tech Companies Are Finding a Business Model

– Govtech.com

Investor interest is helping to point a lot of startup energy at government. Does this mean there’s a place for innovation at city hall?

14 Startups Chosen for San Francisco Regional ‘Startup in Residence’ Program

– Govtech.com

The California cities of San Francisco, Oakland, West Sacramento and San Leandro partner to embed startup solutions in city departments.

Programs seeks entrepreneurs to tackle civic challenges

– San Francisco Chronicle

San Francisco needs a mobile app to monitor coyote sightings, a way to text public health information to residents and an online lottery for reserving sports fields. Oakland needs an app for Head Start outreach, a solution to streamline landlord-tenant disputes, and software to guide residents in bringing their homes up to code. The two cities, along with West Sacramento and San Leandro, are now seeking technology entrepreneurs to tackle these and other challenges during a 16-week Startup in Residence (Stir) program that will launch in April.

How To STIR Up Innovation

– ReadWrite

The core mission of San Francisco’s Startup in Residence program (STIR) is “To bring together government and startups to explore ways to use technology to make government more accountable, efficient and responsive.” It’s the usual excruciatingly boring description of a government program that we have all come to expect. The reality, however, is much different, and in fact, this program has become ground zero for how smart cities and smart startups are going to be coming together in the future.

How Startups Are Helping Build a 21st Century Government

– Huffington Post

Last week, we announced the launch of the second Startup in Residence (STIR)program for entrepreneurs to work with San Francisco, Oakland, San Leandro and West Sacramento to develop technology-based solutions that address challenges facing local government. We need entrepreneurs and technologists to help build a 21st-century government — one that’s efficient, effective and responsive.

San Francisco Recruits Three California Cities for Regional ‘Startup in Residence’ Program

– Govtech.com

The core mission of San Francisco’s Startup in Residence program (STIR) is “To bring together government and startups to explore ways to use technology to make government more accountable, efficient and responsive.” It’s the usual excruciatingly boring description of a government program that we have all come to expect. The reality, however, is much different, and in fact, this program has become ground zero for how smart cities and smart startups are going to be coming together in the future.

City Governments Are Collaborating With Startups, and Acting Like Ones Themselves

– Smithsonian.com

Americans often consider local city governments to be lethargic and generally averse to change. In recent years, however, several cities, including Boston, Philadelphia and San Francisco, have established groundbreaking new offices, focused specifically on innovation and risk-taking, that are dispelling this long-held stereotype.

New SF effort will embed startup DNA into government

– Govfresh

The trend towards injecting fresh perspectives into the business of government via innovation fellowships, civic startup incubators and accelerators continues to grow with San Francisco’s recent announcement of a city entrepreneurship-in-residence program.

San Francisco launches Entrepreneur-in-Residence program to get startups to help solve city problems

– The Next Web

San Francisco’s public sector is interested in becoming much more efficient, productive, and helpful to its constituents. City officials announced today the creation of an Entrepreneur-in-Residence program to support those entrepreneurs and startups who feel their technology can actually do some good for the public and help the city overcome its bottleneck of inefficiency.